Anonymous launches boycott of PayPal

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Last night, Anonymous, through its @AnonymousIRC Twitter account, launched a boycott of PayPal. Unlike previous campaigns, Anonymous did not organize a DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service) attack, which overloads a website and causes it to crash. This time, as one supporter described it, they were launching a DBoS (Distributed Boycott of Services). Backstory: Anonymous launched a DDoS attack on PayPal in December when the online-payment site refused to let users donate to WikiLeaks. Last week, the FBI announced the arrest of 14 people it said participated in that campaign. On Monday, the student newspaper at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas reported that one of its students, Mercedes Renee Haefer, 20, was one of the 14 arrested. On Monday night, @AnonmousIRC tweeted a link to another story purportedly showing a picture of Haefer. Her name had been reported before, and her attorney was quoted as comparing her to Daniel Ellsberg, who famously leaked the Pentagon Papers in 1971. Maybe it was the photo – a webcam shot of an attractive young woman wearing headphones – that got Anonymous fired up. Ironically, a face to sympathize with. @AnonymousIRC retweeted people who said they had closed their PayPal accounts and shared screencaps to prove it. More

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Hax0rs!

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Hackers are hacking. Sony, unfortunately, can’t catch a break. “Hello , Iam Idahc a Lebanese hacker. I was Bored and I play the game of the year: ‘hacker vs Sony.’” The new popular kid on the block is LulzSec. He or they even have a Twitter account to taunt LulzSec’s hapless victims and spread LULZ. LulzSec claims to have hacked an FBI-affiliated organization called InfraGard. LulzSec recently hacked a PBS and posted a fake news story reporting that Tupac Shakur was alive and living in New Zealand. LulzSec also steals and makes public passwords and other personal data. Sony confirmed that it was breached by LulzSec this week. The most ominous recent hacking incident involved defense contractor Lockheed Martin using the now compromised RSA SecureID system, which was regarded as the ‘gold standard” for Internet security. The perpetrator of that hack has yet to be identified.